Strict Standards: Non-static method utf_normalizer::nfkc() should not be called statically in /web/bajagay/public_html/includes/utf/utf_tools.php on line 1663

Strict Standards: Non-static method utf_normalizer::nfkc() should not be called statically in /web/bajagay/public_html/includes/utf/utf_tools.php on line 1663

Strict Standards: Non-static method utf_normalizer::nfkc() should not be called statically in /web/bajagay/public_html/includes/utf/utf_tools.php on line 1663

Strict Standards: Non-static method utf_normalizer::nfkc() should not be called statically in /web/bajagay/public_html/includes/utf/utf_tools.php on line 1663

Strict Standards: Non-static method utf_normalizer::nfkc() should not be called statically in /web/bajagay/public_html/includes/utf/utf_tools.php on line 1663

Strict Standards: Non-static method utf_normalizer::nfkc() should not be called statically in /web/bajagay/public_html/includes/utf/utf_tools.php on line 1663

Strict Standards: Non-static method utf_normalizer::nfkc() should not be called statically in /web/bajagay/public_html/includes/utf/utf_tools.php on line 1663

Strict Standards: Non-static method utf_normalizer::nfkc() should not be called statically in /web/bajagay/public_html/includes/utf/utf_tools.php on line 1663

Strict Standards: Non-static method utf_normalizer::nfkc() should not be called statically in /web/bajagay/public_html/includes/utf/utf_tools.php on line 1663

Strict Standards: Non-static method utf_normalizer::nfkc() should not be called statically in /web/bajagay/public_html/includes/utf/utf_tools.php on line 1663

Strict Standards: Non-static method utf_normalizer::nfkc() should not be called statically in /web/bajagay/public_html/includes/utf/utf_tools.php on line 1663

Strict Standards: Non-static method utf_normalizer::nfkc() should not be called statically in /web/bajagay/public_html/includes/utf/utf_tools.php on line 1663

Strict Standards: Non-static method utf_normalizer::nfkc() should not be called statically in /web/bajagay/public_html/includes/utf/utf_tools.php on line 1663

Strict Standards: Non-static method utf_normalizer::nfkc() should not be called statically in /web/bajagay/public_html/includes/utf/utf_tools.php on line 1663
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/functions.php on line 4674: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at [ROOT]/includes/utf/utf_tools.php:1663)
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/functions.php on line 4676: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at [ROOT]/includes/utf/utf_tools.php:1663)
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/functions.php on line 4677: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at [ROOT]/includes/utf/utf_tools.php:1663)
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/functions.php on line 4678: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at [ROOT]/includes/utf/utf_tools.php:1663)
BajaGay.com - Rosarito Beach
View unanswered posts | View active topics It is currently Sun Sep 21, 2014 5:04 am

BajaGay.com | Promote Your Page Too




Reply to topic  [ 12 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Rosarito Beach 
Author Message
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Wed Feb 11, 2009 1:30 am
Posts: 658
Location: Rosarito, Baja California, MX
Post Rosarito Beach
Dining in Rosarito.

Rosarito Beach is blessed with an abundance of culinary establishments that provide gourmet food along with a good selection of Baja California wines. Mexico's premier wine country is located just forty miles south of Rosarito, allowing chefs and restaurant owners an opportunity to explore the wine region and personally select wines that match well with their culinary delights.
Attachment:
Rosarito 3.09 001.jpg
Rosarito 3.09 001.jpg [ 87.66 KiB | Viewed 784853 times ]


When the BajaBoyz decide to get together for a dinner celebration, one of our favorite spots is the delightfully authentic La Estancia. While they serve some pretty good seafood dinners, some chicken and wild game fowl, La Estancia is known for pleasing red-meat eaters. The filet mignon is a Kenito favorite! In addition to beef, you can also find venison, buffalo, and various other things that run wild in the night (no not your old boyfriend). This location is across the street from their original incarnation, but still has all the rustic charm of the old west... to be honest, it is kind of a mix of Mexican, American, and Tex-Mex... but the food is all good. All of the meals are a complete three course meal, (four if you count the freshly made tortilla chips and even fresher salsa) starting with a cheese and avocado infused Tortilla Soup. Then comes a salad with choice of dressings, and finally your steaks, served on super hot metal platters complete with a flaming slice of Orange. All steaks come with a baked potato with sour cream and butter, and a vegetable selection. La Estancia accepts Master Card and Visa, is open 7 days a week, offers a full bar, and everything is made to order, meaning you can actually get a rare steak in Mexico if you want one! La Estancia, Ave. Francisco Villa # 316, Col. Obrera, Phone: (01152661) 613-0695 http://maps.google.com/maps/place?cid=8728241913519627594&q=Restaurant+La+Estancia+,+Rosarito&hl=en&action=openform#zrvparent

In addition, Portofino Restaurant at Plaza Festival offers monthly wine and food dinners in hopes of educating locals and tourists about the new wave of high quality wines and cuisine being created in the region. Several other restaurants in the area have upgraded and improved their wine lists to compliment Mexico's "silent revolution in creating good wine." At Portofino, they serve an example of Italian culinary wonders in a quiet, and potentially romantic setting even though in downtown Rosarito Beach. Portofino, in the Festival Plaza Hotel, upstairs, Boulevard Benito Juarez, centro Rosarito, [52] 661-612-2950. Accepts Visa and Mastercard.

A great way to sample a variety of wines and artisan cuisine in a single afternoon or evening is to visit several local hot spots and explore one wine and one entree at each location. I like to start my "vino and food explorations" at #184 Blvd. Benito Juarez, in Bistro Le Cousteau. Renowned Chef Phillippe Chauvin and partner Gloria Luz offer some of the best cuisine for the money in the region. They focus on French-European cuisine using fresh, local ingredients paired with a good selection of regional wines. For starters you just can't beat their Ensalada Italiana at US$6.00. This flavorful salad is a dynamic mix of tomatoes, onions, fresh herbs, anchovy, tuna and provolone cheese that pairs well with a Blanc de Blanc from L. A. Cetto winery. They're now open on Mondays; open Tuesday thru Friday from 1 p.m. to 10 p.m., and until 11 p.m. on Friday and Saturday. [52] 661-612-2655.

Chef Carlo Di Gristina at That's Amore, #192 Blvd. Benito Juarez, can dazzle you with one of his gourmet Italian lunch or dinner entrees. My favorite is Linguine alle Vongole, linguine tossed with clams in a choice of natural wine or tomato sauce, for US$13.00. This culinary delight matches perfectly with either Santo Tomas (ST) Chardonnay, or Pinot Grigio Santa Margherita. Chef Carlo offers daily lunch specials, as well as palate pleasing homemade soups and pastas from US$5.99 to $9.99; or dinner specials from US$7.99 to $10.99. Corkage fees here are US$10.00. (A little more expensive than Portofino, but often well worth it.) Open Wednesday thru Sunday from 1 p.m. to 10. p.m. [52] 661-100-2424. This charming and quaint venue is located in front of Quinta del Mar, on the opposite side of Blvd. Juarez.

Another easy dining option can be found at El Nido Restaurant in the heart of Rosarito, at Blvd. Benito Juarez #67. This dependable establishment has been open since 1971, providing locals and tourists with quality food and local wine. For a real treat, I suggest their mesquite broiled venison steak at US$20.00, served with bean soup, fresh salad with either French or Roquefort dressing, homemade tortillas, and baked potato with sour cream and/or butter. Match this with a 2004 Nebbiolo from L.A. Cetto winery and you'll be in a blissful world of contentment and satisfaction. Open Wednesday -Saturday from 4 p.m. to 10 p.m., and Sunday from 1 p.m. to 11 p.m. [52] 661-613-1187.

A classic way to end this romantic afternoon or evening with your favorite lover or friend is to visit Susanne Stehr; owner of Susanna's, which is located in the Pueblo Plaza on Blvd. Benito Juarez. She is a charming hostess, an early pioneer in the concept of pairing quality Mexican wine with her popular California-style cuisine, and in promoting the wines of Baja California. Her wine list is the most comprehensive and informative presentation in town and features suggested wines on her menu that match well with her gourmet cuisine.

One popular option here is the "before dark" menu at US$10.00, offered Monday-Friday from 1p.m. to 5 p.m. Locals and tourists rave about the quality of her cuisine, great service, hospitality and diverse wine selection. For a decadent dessert try matching her chocolate fudge cake, brushed with Kahlua, iced with chocolate fudge frosting, served with vanilla ice cream and chocolate sauce. Pair this with either a port wine from Santo Tomas winery, or with her remarkable pomegranate liquor. Susanna's is open daily (closed Tuesdays) from 1 p.m. to 9 p.m., and until 10:30 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays. [52] 661-613-1187.

Ideally, this short wine and gourmet culinary tour will expose you to a few of the excellent opportunities awaiting you in Rosarito Beach, Baja California, Mexico. This is the perfect time to visit the region with discounted lodging rates and summer-like weather. All of these restaurants are within five blocks of each other and one block from the ocean. For those who are seeking a "wild and crazy" experience, either walk or taxi around town and have a great adventure without having to drink and drive.



Last edited by Kenito on Mon Jul 26, 2010 8:01 pm, edited 3 times in total.



Sun Dec 06, 2009 6:24 pm
Profile
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Wed Feb 11, 2009 1:30 am
Posts: 658
Location: Rosarito, Baja California, MX
Post Re: Rosarito Beach
El Nido
One of Rosarito's oldest restaurants, El Nido specializes in mesquite-grilled steaks. Its ranchers grow all of the meat---beef, lamb, deer, quail and rabbit---organically on the owner's farms, and the architectural elements---dark wood and bricks, a volcanic-rock waterfall, an atrium patio and a central fireplace---create a warm, intimate ambiance. Breakfast burritos, eggs, French toast and hot cakes ($4-$6) include hash browns, refried beans and homemade flour tortillas. Dinners ($7-$28) include soup and salad, tortillas and potato. Bring an appetite and cash because El Nido doesn't accept credit cards.

Benito Juarez Blvd. #67
Rosarito Beach, Baja California Norte, Mexico
(661) 612-1430
elnidorosarito.net

Portofino
It's located in the heart of downtown, but Portofino's Italian fishing village atmosphere allows hungry travelers to forget they are in the middle of nightclub mecca. Italian and Mexican dishes, wide selection of Baja wines and daily specials costing less than $5 make Portofino a favorite among locals, too. Ask for the special menu and pay about $4.50 for an entrée, side salad and iced tea daily between noon to 10 p.m. The same items---spaghetti alla bolognesa, fettuccini alfredo con pollo, pepperoni pizza, picatta di pollo and pesce al rosmarino, among others---run between $9-$12 on the regular menu.

Benito Juárez Blvd. #1207-1
Baja California Norte, Mexico
(800) 453-8606

Ortega's Ocean View
Puerto Nuevo-style lobster is a must-eat for northern Baja visitors, so why not enjoy the local flavor where it originated: Puerto Nuevo, a small town about 12 miles south of Rosarito. While more than 30 restaurants in the "Lobster Village" serve the same traditional meal---pan-fried lobster with beans, rice and homemade flour tortillas on the side---prices and quality vary, with some Puerto Nuevo restaurants using fresh langostas while others serve frozen. Oretega's serves up cheap, fresh lobster, around $15, at rooftop tables with views of the sun setting over the Pacific. No credit cards are accepted.

Calle Anzuelo 15-A
Puerto Nuevo, Baja California Norte
(661) 112-5322


Tue Dec 08, 2009 8:31 pm
Profile
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Wed Feb 11, 2009 1:30 am
Posts: 658
Location: Rosarito, Baja California, MX
Post Re: Rosarito Beach
Rosarito's Larger Hotels

Located a short drive across the California and Mexico border just south of Tijuana, Rosarito offers miles of beautiful beaches that lure weekend warriors to its fabled shores. Brimming with nightclubs and partygoers, Rosarito is more than just a party town, however. Outdoor adventurers will find plentiful opportunities for camping, fishing, swimming, kayaking, body surfing, biking, as well as hiking along the bluffs on the southern end of the town and beyond. The annual Rosarito-Ensenada 50-Mile Bike Ride combines fun and challenge for novices and enthusiasts alike. After a day of soaking up the sun in Rosarito, kick back and enjoy the resort lifestyle at one of the town's many luxury accommodations.

Las Rocas Resort & Spa
Fronting the beautiful, blue Pacific Ocean, Las Rocas Resort & Spa unfolds into refined luxury, featuring beautifully appointed guest rooms with broad terraces and 180-degree ocean views. Upon returning from a day of water sport activities in Rosarito, or perhaps fishing off the town's golden shores, adventure vacationers can unwind in the resort's holistic spa, where rejuvenating treatments, massages and manicures await. An award-winning restaurant upholds the Las Rocas tradition of sterling hospitality. The spa is gay friendly.

Las Rocas Resort & Spa
3850 Carretera libre Tijuana-Ensenada Playas De Rosarito,
Baja California C.P 22710
Mexico
(866) 445-8909

Hotel Califia
Tucked a distance away from the infamous party areas of downtown, the iconic Hotel Califia stands sentry on the bluffs above the coast, a historic landmark at the entry of Rosarito. With 80 luxurious guest rooms, two suites and 11 oceanfront room, the handsomely appointed historic hotel offers three superb dining restaurants highlighted by the Titanic Room overlooking the crashing surf below. Nearby is the Titanic Museum, located in the area where parts of the movie "Titanic" were filmed.

Hotel Califia
KM. 35.5 Old Road To Ensenada
Rosarito Beach, Baja California, Mexico
+(661) 612-1580

Rosarito Beach Hotel
Constructed in 1926, this vintage hotel hugs the water's edge on the beautiful Baja coastline. Continued expansion over the years yields plentiful guestrooms artfully appointed with modern design and abundant amenities. Some of the luxury suites even feature spiral staircases leading to upper bedrooms with first-rate views. Sandwiched between the Aztec Restaurant and the Beachcomber bar, an Olympic-size pool presents a refreshing destination for guests, while the second pool features a water slide, Jacuzzi and bridge. When staying at this world-class hotel, you will be walking in the footsteps of famous guests from the past, including Marilyn Monroe, Lana Turner, Spencer Tracy and Orson Wells.

The new Condo Hotel Tower was completed in 2008, and is state of the art Baja condominium living. Two pools, including the roof-top pool for maximum luxury and privacy. Soon to be announced: TimeShares at the Rosarito Beach Hotel with an RCI affiliation. The Rosarito Beach Hotel complex is gay friendly.

Rosarito Beach Hotel
Boulevard Benito Juarez # 31

Rosarito, Baja California México
1 (866) ROSARITO


Tue Dec 08, 2009 8:35 pm
Profile
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Wed Feb 11, 2009 1:30 am
Posts: 658
Location: Rosarito, Baja California, MX
Post Re: Rosarito Beach
Border Tours of San Diego

By Writer | http://www.ehow.com/list_6122985_border ... diego.html

Shopping in Mexico

San Diego is a is a popular tourist destination with year-round sunshine and a mild climate. A favorite activity for travelers to San Diego is a day trip across the border into Mexico to visit the nearby tourist attractions and beaches. The most popular destinations include Rosarito Beach, Ensenada, Baja California wine country and the city of Tijuana in Mexico. San Diego is conveniently located less than an hour by car from the Mexican border. Many visitors appreciate the ease and added peace of mind that comes with taking an organized tour across the border.

Five Star Tours
Established in 1972, Five Star Tours operates one-day border tours to Rosarito Beach, Baja California and city of Tijuana in Mexico. Five Star Tours offers standard itineraries and fully customizable tours for groups and individuals traveling to Mexico. The company also provides shuttle transportation across the border for independent travelers. Tours include transportation and assistance with border crossing formalities. Featured Five Star Tours include a Tijuana City Tour, Rosarito Beach Tour, Baja Wine Tour, Baja Lobster Tour and an Ensenada Nature Bay Tour. The Baja Wine Tour is a wine and culinary adventure tour into the Baja California region of Mexico, visiting small villages and wineries in the Valley of Guadalupe, one of the oldest wine producing regions in Mexico.

Five Star Tours & Charter Company
1050 Kettner Blvd.
San Diego, CA 92101
800-553-8687
sdsuntours.com

San Diego Tours
San Diego Tours operates one-day border tours to northern Mexico from San Diego. San Diego Tours visit the charming Mexican seaport town of Ensenada, Rosarito Beach and the city of Tijuana in Mexico. Tours include the service of a guide and transportation from San Diego. Visitors to Rosarito Beach can enjoy a relaxing day on the beach in Mexico and tour the famous Rosarito Beach Hotel. San Diego Tours to Ensenada travel along Mexico's stunning coastline, visiting towns and beaches along the route to Ensenada, and afford several hours for shopping, dining and sightseeing in town. Other San Diego Tours include a Baja Mexico Wine Tour, Lobster Tour and combined San Diego and Tijuana dual-city tour package.

San Diego Tours
800-303-7197
sandiegotours.us

San Diego Scenic Tours
San Diego Scenic Tours was established in 1993. San Diego Scenic Tours offers full- and half-day tours to the city of Tijuana in Mexico. Tijuana is the fourth-largest city in Mexico and receives more than 45 million tourists each year, the majority of which visit on one-day border tours from neighboring San Diego. San Diego Scenic Tours' one-day guided city tours are informative and include comprehensive sightseeing itineraries and transportation. In addition to sightseeing, travelers to Tijuana will have time for shopping at the more than 4,000 tourist shops that are located throughout the city. All types of Mexican handcrafts and goods from across the country are available in Tijuana, including silver, leather, traditional crafts and folk art.

San Diego Scenic Tours
2255 Garnet Ave. #3
San Diego, CA 92109
858-273-8687
sandiegoscenictours.com


Tue Mar 30, 2010 7:27 pm
Profile
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Wed Feb 11, 2009 1:30 am
Posts: 658
Location: Rosarito, Baja California, MX
Post Re: Rosarito Beach
Camping in Rosarito Beach

Rosarito Beach (Playas de Rosarito) in Mexico has a mild climate and long, sandy beaches perfect for beachcombers, surfers and sunbathers. Horseback riding is popular in the historic Rosarito Canyon as is golfing on two nearby courses. There also are shopping, art galleries and restaurants to enjoy in town. RVers have several nice options in Rosarito Beach.

Oasis Resort and RV Park
Oasis Resort and RV Park is within walking distance to the beach with ocean views.
With two swimming pools, a weight room, tennis courts, mini-golf, a sauna and a Jacuzzi, this is a luxury campground. Each RV site has a patio, grill and full hookups including TV.

Oasis Resort and RV Park
KM 25 Carretera Escenica Tijuana-Ensenada,
Baja California, Mexico
P.O. Box 158,
Imperial Beach, CA 91933
888-709-9985
ontheroadin.com/baja/bajarvparks/oasisresortrosario.htm

Popotla RV Park
Popotla, although only 10 minutes south of Rosarito Beach, is often overlooked by tourists, which makes it a nice escape for those seeking a true test of Baja Norte Mexico. Famous for its fish tacos, this town began as, and still is, a fishing village.

Popotla RV Park is located on the beach, is gated for security and offers a restaurant, bar and pool. Full hookups and laundry facilities also are available.

Popotla RV Park
KM33 Carretera Libre Tijuana-Ensenada,
Rosarito, Baja California, Mexico
011 (+52) 661-612-1502
ontheroadin.com/baja/bajarvparks/popotlarvpark.htm

K 36 RV Campground
Location is the draw for surfers, beachcombers and others to the K 36 RV Campground. A big draw for surfers because of its famous waves, it's located on the beach. There are electric hookups and bathrooms on site.

K 36 RV and Camping
KM 36.5 Carretera Libre Tijuana-Ensenada
Rosarito, Baja California, Mexico
011 (+52) 664-613-2053
ontheroadin.com/baja/bajarvparks/campallegro.htm


Wed Apr 07, 2010 7:09 pm
Profile
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Wed Feb 11, 2009 1:30 am
Posts: 658
Location: Rosarito, Baja California, MX
Post Re: Rosarito Beach
History of Rosarito Beach, Baja California, Mexico

Prehistory
Evidence of the presence of Paleo-Indians in the region has been dated as early as 10,000 B.C. By 3,000 B.C., a group emerged that is recognizable as the Yuman ancestors of the Kumeyaay, who continued to inhabit the northern portion of the Baja California Peninsula at the time of European contact. The Kumeyaay referred to the area now known as Rosarito Beach as Wa-cuatay, which translates to "big houses" in the Kumeyaay language.

European arrival and missions
In September 1542, Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo passed through the Rosarito Beach area on his way from Ensenada to San Diego Bay. In 1773, a frontier was defined separating Nueva ("new") or Alta ("upper") California, under the jurisdiction of the Franciscans, from Antigua ("old") or Baja ("lower") California, which was entrusted to the Dominicans. In 1788, Luis de Sales, a Dominican priest, redrew the boundary, extending Baja California to the Rosarito Arroyo, known at the time as the Barrabas Arroyo. In 1817, Dominican missionary Tomás de Ahumada founded the Misión San Miguel la Nueva among the Kumeyaay people 22 kilometers to the south of the present-day Rosarito Beach.

Ranching
The property of El Rosarito Ranch, granted to Don José Manuel Machado on 1825, stands out as the first in the area. Subsequently his son, Don Joaquín Machado, applied for title to the land to President Porfirio Díaz. On May 14, 1885, Machado received his title and registered it in Ensenada, then the capital city of the state of Baja California. May 14 is now recognized and celebrated as Rosarito's Foundation Day by the Historical Society of Rosarito.

Tourism
It began with the Barbachano family's establishment of the Rosarito Beach Hotel and Rene's bar in 1925. The family, who has been prominent in politics and culture in Mexico since the early 19th century, also built the first highway, allowing tourists from San Diego to visit the area.

While Prohibition was the law of the land, many U.S. residents began to cross the border into Mexico, where drinking was still legal. Tijuana seemed to attract a more speakeasy-oriented clientele, and Rosarito became a haven for the more well-heeled and Hollywood set. Hollywood film stars such as Orson Welles and Dolores del Río visited Rosarito. They were attracted by hunting (deer, quail and rabbit) and fishing (lobster, abalone).

While Rita Hayworth was married to Prince Aly Khan, son of Aga Khan, the two would visit the Rosarito Beach Hotel, take over an entire floor, and bring their own staff, including a personal chef. Other Hollywood visitors included Mickey Rooney, Ava Gardner, Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn. In recent years, Britney Spears and Mel Gibson have been seen enjoying day trips to Rosarito.

Farming
The Ejido, common land for farming, began when, on August 17, 1930, General Lázaro Cárdenas, then President of Mexico, issued a resolution granting 46.71 square kilometres (over 10,000 acres) of land to a community of local farmers known as Ejido Mazatlán.

Urbanization
Urbanization developed in 1950 Rosarito's with the planning and construction of streets and city blocks. As land sales soared, coupled with the construction of small restaurants, some shops and two hotels, the city began to take shape. In the 1960s, Rosarito entered the commercial/industrial era with the constructions of a huge thermoelectric power plant and the later installations of Pemex, the state-owned petroleum company.

Construction
During the 1970s and early 1980s, Rosarito's growth was moderate but constant. The well-known lobster village, Puerto Nuevo arose in the 1970s and 80s, just fifteen minutes south of Rosarito, originally as a fishermen's neighborhood who would offer the daily catch in their living room, and now is a tourist/culinary destination. In the early 1990s appreciable economic growth was achieved by the construction and competition of numerous hotels, condominiums and shopping centers established along the main street. This street has been renovated and enlarge to encompass four lanes and a lighted meridian strip and was officially designated Boulevard Benito Juárez in the year 1989.

Incorporation
A Barbachano descendant, Hugo Torres Chabert, current owner of the Rosarito Beach Hotel, led the drive to incorporate the city in 1995, and was appointed to a term as Mayor.

On December 1, 1995, Rosarito was converted from a suburb of Tijuana, to an independent city. The territory surrounding the city became the fifth municipio (municipality) of the State of Baja California. The impact of cityhood on modern Rosarito Beach cannot be understated. Prior to incorporation, all tax revenue was filtered through the coffers of Tijuana. Post incorporation has marked major improvements in infrastructure. Due to rapid growth, some streets are indeed still unpaved, however the vast majority of streets have been improved with pavement, curbs and street lights. The city announced in late 2008 that the Baja water and sewer utility was expediting completion of major projects and paving would soon be complete.

The major downtown corridor, Boulevard Benito Juarez, is on a steady rejuvenation plan, where all new period street lights, wide sidewalks, curbs and gutters are being constructed.

Now, Rosarito offers more than 900 hotel rooms from 25 resorts, hotels & motels; golf courses and spas. The Popotla Boulevard area in south Rosarito is developing a reputation for original art and furniture manufacturing. Around 2005 the latest real estate boom began in Rosarito and what is often called "the Baja Gold Coast." Within a few years, scarcely a piece of oceanfront property large enough for a condominium resort was left unsold to developers.

In 2007, Torres Chabert ran for election and was overwhelmingly elected to a new three year term. The subjects of rising crime rates and police corruption were major issues in the campaign. Torres Chabert is deeply concerned about the safety of tourists, and pledged strong action to deal with both issues. In early 2008, both federal and state police were ordered into the city (along with neighboring Tijuana) to reinforce the city's efforts, which have largely been successful.

On the site of the city fairgrounds in North Rosarito, a new "Rosarito Pabellion" (Pavilion) shopping center began construction in late 2007. Said to become the largest shopping center in Baja California, it includes major anchors, (Home Depot, Wal-Mart, Coppell, Ashley's Furniture) Cineopolis multi-plex theaters, and chain restaurants such as Burger King, Subway, Applebee's and VIPs.

South of the commercial center along Boulevard Benito Juarez, a new, widened four lane Boulevard Popotla is rapidly developing a reputation as a target area for hand-crafted "rustico" furniture, metal sculpture, and boutique art studios and galleries. Fox Studios, where scenes from the movie Titanic were filmed, is located here.

History of Puerto Nuevo - Lobster Village
In 1954, Rosa María Plasencia's father came to live in what's now the famous lobster village of Puerto Nuevo. He came because he'd heard there were lots of lobsters there. A year later, Rosa María's mother's family came. The two young people met, fell in love, married and built a tiny house across the street from what is now the family restaurant, Puerto Nuevo II.

At that time, there were only two or three families living on the cliffs overlooking the Pacific. Every day the men went out to sea in their pangas. Every afternoon their wives would scan the waters until they saw their husbands' boats materialize on the horizon. Once a positive sighting was made, they'd rush to heat up beans and rice, pound out some fresh tortillas and put a kettle of lard on the fire. The men always came back ravenous, and when they unloaded their catch of lobsters, they'd slice a few in half, drop them into the bubbling lard and fry them up. There was no refrigeration, so the now-famous meal of fresh fried lobster, beans, rice and tortillas came into being purely out of necessity.

In about 1956, Rosa María's father sent to Guadalajara for his brother and sister. They came and joined in the fishing and cooking. A few more families migrated to the area.

One built a little stand next to the bus stop, where the welcoming arches are now. They sold sodas, snacks and burritos. Next to their stand was a billboard advertising New Port cigarettes. Americans would show up and ask the men to take them fishing in their pangas. When they came back in, they'd join the Mexicans in a big meal.

The Americans named the village after that sign, which, translated into Spanish is Puerto Nuevo!

Over the years more and more people came from central Mexico. Some were intent on making their way to the USA, but stayed to fish and serve lobsters to the ever-growing crowds of visitors. A political activist, Señora Rentería, helped the families in Puerto Nuevo to get a grant from the government so they could have additional land to build on.

She succeeded in getting 17 plots of land assigned to the locals and in gratitude for this; they named the village's main street after her. Restaurant Puerto Nuevo I founded by Rosa María's aunt and stepfather was built on the first lot assigned. Puerto Nuevo II was built on the second lot, and got its name because of it. A third family built yet another restaurant. All of them charged about 50 cents for a lobster dinner back then. A major growth spurt occurred in Puerto Nuevo in the '70s when the Ortega family came to town and built four restaurants, which they publicized widely.


Sat Apr 10, 2010 11:12 am
Profile
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Wed Feb 11, 2009 1:30 am
Posts: 658
Location: Rosarito, Baja California, MX
Post Re: Rosarito Beach
Baja's Tourism Police Are There to Lend Hand

Rosarito Beach — With the Tijuana-Ensenada toll road as the backdrop, authorities yesterday launched a new Metropolitan Tourist Police force aimed at winning back the confidence of foreign visitors to the region.

The group is made up of municipal officers from Tijuana, Ensenada and Rosarito Beach who will operate under a shared name and uniform as they patrol traditional tourist areas. Their common mandate: Assist visitors who patronize hotels, restaurants and shops in the 70-mile strip that links the three cities.

The officers are stepping into the role at a time when Baja California’s tourism industry has been struggling to revive itself after a decline in U.S. visitors. Authorities say they want to regain the trust of visitors driven away by reports of violence and police extortion, and restore the image of the region as a safe place to visit.

While Baja California authorities say crime rates have fallen and police agencies have taken extensive steps to reduce corruption, “the perception in Southern California is … that this zone is very dangerous,” said Hugo Torres, Rosarito Beach’s mayor and owner of the city’s largest hotel. “The message that must be sent out to Southern Californians is that they will be receiving better service, without a doubt.”

The new force comes into existence during an important vacation period across Baja California, when spring break coincides with Holy Week. In addition, thousands of cyclists are expected April 17 for the semiannual 50-mile Rosarito-Ensenada Bicycle Ride.

Oscar Escobedo, Baja California’s tourism secretary, said perceptions about safety are not the only deterrent to foreign visitors. He primarily blames clogged border crossings and a requirement since June that U.S. citizens present passports when returning home. This year, the state took steps to promote domestic tourism to make up for the loss in foreign visitors, and Escobedo expects about 120,000 travelers this week.

Members of the newly created force, most of whom are bilingual, have been tasked with responding to any domestic or foreign tourists who call to report crimes or ask for emergency assistance, said Daniel de la Rosa, Baja California’s secretary of public safety. His agency is responsible for coordinating the effort.

De la Rosa said the force is starting with two dozen patrol cars and 130 officers, but is expected to grow. Most officers are drawn from existing tourist-assistance units in the three cities, and officials hope the new force eventually will operate autonomously, with the authority to issue its own traffic citations.

The new force is being backed by the public safety and tourism secretariats, as well as the federal police. In December, the San Diego Police Department gave a daylong course to 24 Mexican officers, instructing them in subjects such as patrol tactics, gangs and how to treat U.S. tourists.

Julián Domínguez, a deputy chief in Tijuana, said officers are being instructed to go easy on visitors who commit infractions such as heading in the wrong direction down one-way streets. “There won’t be tickets, just warnings, if the infraction is minor,” he said.


Sandra Dibble: sandra.dibble(at)uniontrib.com


Sun Apr 11, 2010 11:33 pm
Profile
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Wed Feb 11, 2009 1:30 am
Posts: 658
Location: Rosarito, Baja California, MX
Post Re: Rosarito Beach
Rosarito – Baja California Mexico

For a number of years now, Rosarito has been a popular weekend destination for many Southern Californian tourists, most of them college students out to get a bit of a breather from their grueling classes. It’s easy to see why the area is such a popular tourist attraction given its endless stretches of beaches and excellent surfing spots, not to mention the vibrant nightlife and party scene, which is reputed to be one of the liveliest anywhere in the world.

What many people haven’t realized yet however is that Rosarito is also a great place for calmer and more relaxing pursuits. While its reputation as a party destination is certainly well deserved, Rosarito could very well be the perfect place to own a vacation home…or even plan your retirement.

One of the most surprising things about Rosarito is its location. It’s only 22 miles from the U.S.-Mexican border–which translates to about a 20-minute drive–but even this short distance is enough to transport you to a beach paradise where the weather is perfect all year ’round and breathtaking natural sights are an ever-present delight. The world famous warmth and hospitality of the local residents and the distinctively international flair of the area makes Rosarito stand head and shoulders above a host of similar tourist destinations.

One other factor that makes Rosarito such a pleasure is that virtually every spot on the beach is easily accessible from anywhere else. Walking is by far the most common way to get around and this will give you the opportunity for some truly memorable explorations.

While you’re exploring, you may want to take the time to indulge in another one of Rosarito’s most popular activities: shopping! There are several shops along the beach that offer everything from handcrafted leather goods to intricately designed silver jewelry. Whether you are intent on picking up a piece of local handicraft or simply looking around, a visit to these artisan shops will surely be a rewarding experience.

All that shopping is bound to work up your appetite and you will be glad to know that Rosarito has something that can help you out in that area as well. The area is home to an absolutely bewildering array of restaurants and food establishments, and whatever type of cuisine you are in the mood for, you will find it here. Of course traditional Mexican cuisine is well represented and as you can imagine, the quality is superb. If your tastes lie elsewhere however, there are also many American, French, Italian and Chinese restaurants to choose from. And you simply must try the world famous Puerto Nuevo lobster while you are in town.

With a full meal under your belt, you are probably thinking of ways to burn a few of those calories off, right? Again Rosarito delivers, with a host of activities that will have you back in shape for the beach in no time. Take your pick from several types of water sports, golf by the ocean, horse back riding, whale watching, ecological tours, spas and biking along the 3rd largest bike path in North America.

So whether you are looking for a quick weekend getaway for two or a place to retire, check out what Rosarito has to offer!


Last edited by Kenito on Wed Apr 21, 2010 6:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.



Sat Apr 17, 2010 7:08 pm
Profile
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Wed Feb 11, 2009 1:30 am
Posts: 658
Location: Rosarito, Baja California, MX
Post Re: Rosarito Beach -- Directions to get here
DRIVING DIRECTIONS TO ROSARITO BEACH

How to Arrive from San Diego

Getting to the Rosarito Beach Hotel is part of the enjoyment of visiting this Baja California resort, and it’s really easy.

The Rosarito Beach Hotel is located in the seaside town of Rosarito Beach. Coming from the US, we will assume that if you are planning a visit to the Rosarito Beach Hotel you will be driving from San Diego. If you are not driving, you could take the “Tijuana Trolley” (rail transportation) to the border, then the Shuttle Bus Service (Mexicoach) to our hotel, otherwise you will have to take a bus, or taxi to Tijuana and then catch a cab to Rosarito Beach.

Okay, let’s go. From San Diego, California, take Interstate Highway 5 or Interstate 805 south. This will take you to the San Ysidro, California border crossing (at Tijuana). There will be various freeway exit signs along the way including one reading “Last U.S. Exit.” If you are planning to walk across the border, then you’ll leave the freeway at this exit, find a parking lot, and proceed to enter Mexico (Tijuana) on foot. If you continue driving, the freeway takes you right into Mexico.

There are two roads that will bring you to Rosarito Beach. The toll road (cuota) and the free (libre) road. The well maintained toll road is faster and easier with beautiful ocean views. The toll highway is also patrolled by the “Green Angels,” a mobile mechanic that will assist you in the event you have mechanical problems.

There are solar powered call boxes located about every two miles along the toll road. If you need help just pick up the phone and a bilingual operator will provide assistance. The free road is harder to find if you are not familiar with Tijuana, Once you locate it, you will find a modern four-lane highway, but with heavy commercial traffic, many exits, and many people. It is not nearly as scenic as the toll route. Our recommendation is to take the toll road.

To get to the toll road from the border, bear to the right just after entering Mexico. Work your way into the right lane as you climb the first small rise. As the road merges with another lane on the right get over into this lane as soon as possible to avoid missing the exit. Take the exit marked Playas de Tijuana Rosarito. This will take you to the road that runs along the international border (Avenida Internacional). You’ll see the border fence to your right as you travel west. You’ll stay on this road as you climb the first hill. Stay right and keep going straight.

As you drop down into the canyon (known as “Smugglers Canyon”), you’ll want to take the right turn-off to the road going west (Marked Ensenada Quota which means Ensenada Toll Road). As you merge, get over into the left lane and stay there. Up another hill and then you’ll drop down to Playas de Tijuana, the beach community of Tijuana. Since we are going to the Rosarito Beach Hotel we’ll stay left and follow the road as it curves left.

Just ahead is the toll booth. A toll fee of approximately $2.35 US dollars will take you all the way to Rosarito Beach. The 17 mile scenic trip will take about twenty minutes. It is a beautiful trip. Some of northern Baja California’s most spectacular scenery is along this route that glides along the coast with its unblemished views of the Pacific Ocean. You’ll pass a number of real estate developments as well, a testimony to Baja California as a highly desirable location for a vacation or retirement home.

At Rosarito Beach, there are four exits off the toll road. The first exit will take your right into town. You’ll drive along Benito Juárez Boulevard (the main street) for about two miles to the Rosarito Beach Hotel, instantly recognizable by the white arches at the hotels entrance. If you would prefer to avoid city traffic, stay on the toll road and take the fourth and last exit which has an arch identifying the town. This exit takes you directly to the Rosarito Beach Hotel (two short blocks to the right).


You’re here! And the most “fantastic” experience of your life is about to begin!


Wed Apr 21, 2010 6:50 pm
Profile
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Wed Feb 11, 2009 1:30 am
Posts: 658
Location: Rosarito, Baja California, MX
Post Re: Rosarito Beach
Rosarito Beach Has Everything This July:
Fireworks, Fantastic Deals, Die Fledermaus

This popular tourist destination just 20 miles south of San Diego offers its visitors just about everything this July: from a U.S.-style July 4th celebration with fireworks to a great expo of Mexican home furnishings to fantastic deals and prices.


There's even the second edition of the city's Opera by the Sea, which this year features Die Fledermaus by Strauss as well as Bizac's Carmen.
Rosarito is home to some of the finest furniture makers anywhere as well as artisans working in stained glass, tile and metal. Their creations and artwork will be on display July 2, 3 and 4 as the large home furnishings expo returns this year to the grounds behind the Rosarito Beach Hotel.

More details are available at http://www.afamaro.com

Also at the hotel, visitors can enjoy a U.S.-style Fourth of July celebration with music, food including hot dogs and hamburgers, plus a fireworks display. Not only is it a great event but it's for a great cause. Admission ($10 and $5) will help support the Flying Samaritans free clinic in Rosarito.

Live entertainment is scheduled from 4 to 10. Advance ticket purchase is suggested. More information is at http://www.flysams4julybbq.com

The Opera by the Sea on July 17 at Rosarito's center for the arts and culture (CEMAC) will include Irish and Russian dancing, living statues, an art exhibit, face painting, clowns and workshops. Mexican food and drinks will be sold. Closed circuit television also will be available to provide enhanced viewing.

The event which starts at 3 is free but seating and parking are limited.

For those with different musical tastes, two concerts are scheduled for July 23: Reik on the beach by the Rosarito Beach Hotel and Pitbull at Papa's & Beer. Visit http://www.rosarito.org, the city's Convention & Visitors website, for more details on these.

For those who fondly remember folksy hometown fairs, the Rosarito city fair has its run this year from July 1 to 25. It's a great place to bring the kids for rides, some fun food, entertainment and other attractions.

Not only is this July jam-packed with fun-filled events --- in addition to the scenery and attractions that always make Rosarito a special destination --- hotels ands restaurants are offering some of the best prices in years. You can build a great trip around almost any budget --- for one person or a large family.

Some hotels this year also are offering tours to various Baja attractions, including the Guadalupe Valley. Rosarito is the nearest resort town to stay south of the border for those wanting to explore Baja's great wine country and its vineyards.

July is a great time for an affordable family vacation or weekend, whether you're interested in a special event or just love to enjoy Baja by the sea: surfing, sunning, shopping, horseback ridings, ATVs, spas --- or just plain relaxing.

This is just a taste of what Rosarito has to offer visitors this summer. More complete event, lodging and dining information plus any updates all are available in detail on http://www.rosarito.org


Sun Jun 20, 2010 1:34 pm
Profile
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Reply to topic   [ 12 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

Who is online

Registered users: Bing [Bot]


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group.
Designed by STSoftware for PTF.
[
SEO MOD © 2007 StarTrekGuide ]